Archive for March, 2017

You know, if this wasn’t so much work, I’d do it right (OMG this is probably what BW said about the faces too :D). :P So a short one will have to do.

So as we all know, Mass Effect came out in 2007. So there are pretty much 10 years between this game and Andromeda.

Without further ado, faces from Andromeda 2017:

Now a random screenshot from Mass Effect 2007:

Do I need to comment on this? Do I seriously even need to comment on this? FUCK ME.

Now below an Asari from 2017, please compare her with the Asari from 2007 in the pic above:

WHAT HAPPENED??? Has anyone checked/compared the system requirements for Mass Effect 1 and those for Mass Effect: Andromeda?!? AHHHHHHHHH! Also: TEN YEARS.

Now a krogan from 2017:

And here good ol’ Wrex from 2007:

Seriously, is this some sort of prank?

Now let’s look at another game from 2007, The Witcher 1:

the-witcher-geralt-of2gu97

And here’s how that looked 8 years after part 1 in 2015 in The Witcher 3:

Also, please note, that The Witcher 3 has lower hardware requirements than Mass Effect: Andromeda needs to pull this off.

What the hell happened here? The fuck? How is EA’s BioWare division getting away with this?!?

random links (18)

“Just” finished Torment. The only thing I regret is not playing Planescape: Torment first/again, because it’s like 10 years since I played that game (yeah yeah, uh the irony of my memory being gone…). A closer comparison might have been nice. Anyway, since it’s always easier to talk about the bad stuff, I’ll start with that.
Number one annoyance must be, that the game doesn’t show how far a character can move during a turn, so a lot of moving with the mouse cursor is necessary, to figure out the edges. It’s especially annoying during long crisis moments, in which all characters have to move (e.g. the “heist” on the alien space station…).

Overall this game doesn’t have any big bugs, especially none which would break quests. Okay, I didn’t encounter any. Who knows if quests can’t break, given the many possibilities… Thus, the general high polish of the game makes the peerless dungeon without doubt the buggiest part of the game. I entered it, started fighting drones and “had to” leave again, because all my resources were already drained from previous adventures (and I couldn’t have known that shutting down the consoles would heal me). When I returned after resting, all robots were still dead/destroyed, but their bodies were still moving around a bit, as if they were still alive. When I opened a door after a crisis occurred, the game crashed, which was my sole crash in the entire game. After restarting and reloading I got through this by finishing the crisis first before opening the door again. As soon as I got out of this place, I never encountered such a problem again.
The pathfinding managed to get the last castoff stuck in 2 or 3 places. This too never happened to me again, after leaving the first city.
At one point I had to unequip and re-equip an item, before the effect of my newly selected concentration skill (neutralizes negative effects of bonded items) became active. Pretty sure that’s what happened.
The ending epilogues were the only thing where I outright thought it was done badly. First, the epilogues are displayed simultaneously to the ending credits (who thought that was a good idea) and each text has a “next” button beneath it, which naturally made me think I would have to click this button to move on to the next one. Second, that’s not the case – after some time, the next epilogue will show up without warning (so the next button is ultimately only there to skip text). I couldn’t read one of the texts, because I expected I would have all the time in the world to do it. So for the next bits I speed-read everything, to make sure I wouldn’t miss more info.
But again, all in all incredible polish. They definitely stepped up their QA since Wasteland 2, this game was riddled with bugs on release day.

So on to the actual game then! I don’t think there’s all that much to say, since, once again, I feel confident to state, that they simply delivered the game they promised during their campaign. To this day, not a single crowdfunding campaign, I participated in, disappointed me.
Torment is deep, detailed and interesting. From start to finish. Is it possible to find stuff in it for nitpicking? Sure, but what really matters, is that they got it mostly right most of the time. And they sure did.
I’d like to mention, that Torment: Tides of Numenera is as different from Pillars of Eternity, as Planescape: Torment was from Baldur’s Gate. That alone is another win.
I absolutely expect inXile to throw out some patches/improvements for this in due time and I’m definitely playing the game again in the future. Yay!

PS: It took me 59 hours (says Steam) to complete the game, as far as I know I played all quests in the game and I tried to actually read everything. I didn’t hurry and focused on enjoying myself.

Also:

Torment: Tides of Numenera